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Thursday, November 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of Quakers and slavery in America. found in the catalog.

Quakers and slavery in America.

Thomas E. Drake

Quakers and slavery in America.

  • 153 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Peter Smith in Gloucester, MA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Slavery and the church -- Society of Friends,
  • Antislavery movements -- United States

  • Edition Notes

    102,827

    The Physical Object
    Pagination246p.
    Number of Pages246
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23263965M


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Quakers and slavery in America. by Thomas E. Drake Download PDF EPUB FB2

I started with the “beginning”: the first antislavery protest in North America, written by German and Dutch Quakers in Pennsylvania. But as I quickly learned, this was only part of the story when it comes to Quakers and slavery.

The Germantown Protest, as it is often called, was the first document in North America to denounce slavery. Quakers in Germantown, now a suburb of Philadelphia, made the first recorded protest against slavery in Many Quakers, especially in the southern colonies, owned slaves at this time.

William Penn himself owned slaves during his four years in Pennsylvania ( and ), though they were later freed and he treated them well. The Quakers in America is a multifaceted history of the Religious Society of Friends and a fascinating study of its culture and controversies today.

Lively vignettes of Conservative, Evangelical, Friends General Conference, and Friends United meetings illuminate basic Quaker theology and reflect the group's diversity while also highlighting Quakers and slavery in America. book. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: viii, pages 21 cm: Contents: Preface-Slavery Troubles the Quaker Conscience-Voices Crying in the Wilderness-The Friends Stop Buying Slaves-The Quakers Free Their Slaves-The Quaker Role in the antislavery Effort of the Revolutionary Period-Friends Lead the Attack on the African Slave Trade, A Generation of.

Quakers and slavery in America. New Haven, Yale University Press, (OCoLC) Online version: Drake, Thomas E. (Thomas Edward), Quakers and slavery in America. New Haven, Yale University Press, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors /. "Quakers and Slavery is an impressive monograph, a carefully argued and unpretentious study that provides the best analysis yet available of the origins, character, and limits of antislavery sentiment for any segment of the slave society of eighteenth-century colonial British America.

The Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) played a major role in the abolition movement against slavery in both the United Kingdom and in the United States of America. Quakers were among the first white people to denounce slavery in the American colonies and Europe, and the Society of Friends became the first organization to take a collective stand against both slavery and the slave trade.

Quakers and Slavery in America, Volume 51 Quakers and slavery in America Volume 51 of Yale historical publications: Miscellany: Author: Thomas Edward Drake: Publisher: Yale University Press, Original from: the University of Michigan: Digitized: Length: pages: Export Citation: BiBTeX EndNote RefMan.

Welcome The Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) was the first corporate body in Britain and North America to fully condemn slavery as both ethically and religiously wrong in all circumstances. It is in Quaker records that we have Quakers and slavery in America.

book of the earliest manifestations. In North America a long process of persuasion culminated inwhen Quakers, involved with slavery, were told to give it up or leave the Society of Friends. Quakers provided a leadership structure, reliable national network, and significant material resources to the campaigns on both sides of the Atlantic.

The history of Quakers is, in some ways, the history of America and its culture. Early forms of government, the fight against war, slavery, poverty were all influenced by the Quakers. Women's rights, many fields of science, the temperance movement were all fueled by the Quakers, who wanted not just to improve themselves but also the by:   Anyone who has studied the antebellum period knows that slavery violated Quaker principles and that some Quakers participated in the Underground Railroad.

One of the most notable Quakers in the Underground Railroad was Levi Coffin, who was born in Guilford County, North Carolina, but as a young man moved to Indiana and later to Cincinnati.

Author: Quakers Helped Abolish Slavery in the U.S. Ryan Jordan, author of Slavery and the Meetinghouse: The Quakers and the Abolitionist Dilemma, explains the role of.

Quakers and slavery in America, Hardcover – January 1, by Thomas E Drake (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Hardcover, Import "Please retry" $ Author: Thomas E Drake.

Quakers and slavery in America by Thomas E. Drake; 3 editions; First published in ; Subjects: Antislavery movements, Slavery and the church, Society of. A very helpful overview of the history and present of Quakers in North America, including thematic chapters on Quaker worship, Quaker beliefs and practices, contemporary debates, interactions with the world, and women and marriage, as well as chronological sections/5.

The formal name of the Quakers, The Religious Society of Friends, was adopted during this period and has been used ever since. If you have Quaker ancestors, you are in luck, because Quakers are well known for keeping excellent records.

There are detailed records of births, deaths, and marriages of Quakers going back to the early ’s. The Quakers, or Friends, were formed in the midth Century by an English shoemaker, George Fox ().

His core belief was that man did not need an intermediary to establish a relationship with God — no trained ministers, no formal church services.

Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published.

Quakers and slavery in America by Thomas E. Drake,Yale University Press edition, in EnglishPages: Drexel University, Class of Quakers & Slavery Digitization Project Intern.

John Woolman, a well known Quaker abolitionist, was born in in Burlington County, New Jersey. Woolman served as a minister of Burlington Monthly Meeting in West Jersey.

He married Sarah Ellis and had one daughter. Woolman felt that slaveholding was. ByQuakers had come to view abolition as a Christian duty and all Quakers, on both sides of the Atlantic, were barred from owning slaves. Any members that did not conform were disowned.

In the 'London Society of Friends' yearly meeting presented a petition against the slave trade, signed by nearly Quakers, to Parliament. The Quakers in America is a multifaceted history of the Religious Society of Friends and a fascinating study of its culture and controversies today.

Lively vignettes of Conservative, Evangelical, Friends General Conference, and Friends United meetings illuminate basic Quaker theology and Brand: Columbia University Press.

about slavery. Drake's book remains indispensable for a factual summary of events during the entire period that slavery existed in this country. However, any book on a subject of such importance as antislavery should be re-examined periodically.

Because it is a summary, Quakers and Slavery in America is not a definitive account of many subjects. The book begins with a substantial introduction to the entire volume that gives an overview of slavery in North America.

Each of the twelve chapters that follow has an introduction that discusses the leading secondary books and articles on the topic in question, followed.

Quakers and Slavery in America. By THOMAS E. DRAKE. (New Haven: Yale University Press, Pp. ix, $) The full story of the Quaker crusade against Negro slavery has waited a long time to be told. It is a story well worth telling, for it illuminates the process by which a momentous social change, amounting to a revolu.

Editorial Reviews "Quakers and Slavery is an impressive monograph, a carefully argued and unpretentious study that provides the best analysis yet available of the origins, character, and limits of antislavery sentiment for any segment of the slave society of eighteenth-century colonial British America.

This is a work of genuine excellence."—Jack P. Greene, The Johns Hopkins UniversityPages:   Ten Books on Slavery You Need to Read. The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America.

A survey of slavery’s very long history in North America, showing how Author: Sven Beckert. Join Gerbner, professor at University of Minnesota, to explore the early history of Quakers and slavery in connection to the development of our modern concept of race in her recent book, Christian Slavery: Conversion and Race in the Protestant Atlantic World (University of Pennsylvania Press, ).

is book explores the growth of abolitionism among Quakers in Pennsylvania and New Jersey from toproviding a case study of how groups change their moral attitudes.

Soderlund details the long battle fought by reformers like gentle John Woolman and eccentric Benjamin Lay. Quakers and Slavery in America remains the book to consult to find out what George Fox or William Penn or Joseph John Gurney thought about slavery.

Drake's book remains indispensable for a factual summary of events during the entire period that slavery existed in this country.

However, any book on a subject of such importance as antislavery. Quakers in North America constitute approximately 21% of Quakers worldwide (), according to the online Quaker Information Center. Quakers (or Friends) are members of a Christian religious movement that started in England in the 17th century, and has spread throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Central America.

Some Quakers originally came to North America to spread their. The Quakers were among the most prominent slave traders during the early days of the country; paradoxically, they were also among the first denominations to protest slavery.

David Brion Davis and Steven Mintz wrote in their book, "The Boisterous Sea of Liberty: A Documentary History of America from Discovery through the Civil War," that "Slavery posed special problems for Quakers, who strove to lead sinless lives. Inthe Philadelphia Yearly Meeting forbade Quakers from buying or selling slaves and required.

And so Lay became, inthe last of a very few Quakers disowned for protests against slavery. Disowned and denounced, Lay still attended worship services and argued about the evils of slavery.

Quakers came to be called such because of a trembling many experienced when talking to God. () Fighting Intolerance and Slavery: Christianity in the 17th and 18th Centuries - Part one of this program traces the spread of Christianity via the Puritans to North America.

A couple of years before he died in at Quakers began to push for an end to slavery and eventually initiated a process to discipline and. Colonial Views of Slavery: The Quakers Posted on August 8, Aug by M.E. Bond Posted in Guest Posts Tagged American history, Christianity, religion, slavery In this guest series written by my mom we’re looking into what can be found in the archives of colonial America about people’s attitudes toward slavery.

In the midth century, John Woolman, an abolitionist Quaker, traveled the American colonies, preaching and advancing the anti-slavery cause. A Quaker miller named Daniel Byrnes () began appearing in New Castle County, Delaware land records inbuying and selling land bordering the south side of Wilmington’s Brandywine River.

That year, Byrnes and William Moore built a mill with an overshot wheel “across the Brandywine near French Street” and fellow Quaker, William Marshall built the dam for their long mill : Kim Burdick. The book's only international content is an examination of British and American Quakers' debates in this period over the feasibility of eliminating slavery in America.

Jordan's early focus on Quakers in southern states is a welcome reminder that antislavery efforts were far more active in the South than in the North prior to Author: Beth A.

Salerno. Quakers & Slavery. more Book Sources: Quakers A selection of books/e-books available in Trible Library. Click the title for location and availability information. The Declaration of Faith of the Society of Friends in America by George Fox Call Number: Online - free - HathiTrust.

Quakers and Slavery, An International Interdisciplinary Conference was held in Philadephia on 4 - 6 November It was hosted by The McNeil Center for Early American Studies, Swarthmore College, and Haverford College, and supported by Bryn Mawr College, Kingston University London, and the University of East Anglia.One-third of the original delegates were Quakers, but not all Quakers supported the organization.

In Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, an anti-slavery society founded in with twenty members, used petitions to call for immediate abolition and built themselves a meeting hall.

This kind of militancy, along with race riots in Philadelphia and other cities, led yearly and monthly Quaker.